WSTB

Winston-Salem's Tallest Buildings and Skyscrapers
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2022 7:28 am 
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Got my copy from Bookmarks! Excellent book by Dr. Margaret Supplee Smith, a nationally renowned architectural historian and Wake Forest University’s Harold W Tribble Professor of Art Emerita. Great detailed back stories on many of the private homes we all know so well. Such an interesting narrative on many of the earliest prominent families that have put such a unique perspective on the Camel City! I highly encourage everyone to buy a copy. A definite keepsake for anyone who loves Winston-Salem.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2022 5:22 pm 
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I just received my copy also and it's a wonderful book. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the history of the city!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2022 8:30 pm 
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waggonera wrote:
I just received my copy also and it's a wonderful book. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the history of the city!


Does it include the great lost homes of the past - or only those still standing?


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2022 8:19 am 
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It focused on existing homes for the most part with the notable exceptions of the John Whitaker estate on Robinhood, the WillSherr Lodge (former RJR president Clay Williams mansion) which was demolished for the Bermuda Run clubhouse, the Johnston-Norfleet House at Reynolda/Arbor Rds., and most notably, Nawn Hall the 1922 home of Will Hanes which was located at the present site of the Piedmont Plaza office complex at Five Points. This house was the only Winston-Salem commission of prominent Charlotte architect Louis H. Asbury and he himself described the project (at the time) as the third most expensive residential project in the state of North Carolina following Biltmore House in Asheville and the Duke Mansion in Charlotte. There were two pictures of the estate in the book that were the first pictures I had ever seen of what the place looked like.

I've really enjoyed reviewing the book and the stories behind the houses. There were still several properties that I would have really loved to have seen included in the book, most notably the mansion across the street from Nawn Hall at the corner of First & Springdale. BTW, was very bummed that the house across Springdale from the aforementioned house couldn't be saved. What a loss :cry:


Last edited by zalo on Fri Apr 29, 2022 10:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2022 9:44 am 
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zalo wrote:
It focused on existing homes for the most part [...]


Okay, thanks. That saves me the time & money of purchasing the book.

The majority of grand homes whose stories would interest me are in the landfill.

They mostly stood on Cherry, High, Fifth, Fourth and Patterson - and a spectacular beauty built for a prominent African-American doctor at the corner of Liberty & Depot.

I find the Colonial Revival stuff of the 1920s quite boring.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2022 10:55 am 
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The book's focus was from the years 1912-1940, which roughly represented the years of the greatest concentration of wealth by Winston's most prominent families and documented the expenditure of funds for grand oversized houses/estates that would rival the upper end housing stock of any city in the nation. The book chronicles the construction of homes that represent a vast array of architectural styles. Dr. Smith did admirable job in telling the back story of how these families came to be able to afford such places and where they previously resided before moving into these manses. I find that to be as interesting as looking at the pictures of the properties.

I wish someone would take on the challenge of documenting the homes that represented the first wave of affluence in the Camel City, Covering from say 1890-1912. That too would be a fascinating read.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2022 12:17 pm 
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zalo wrote:

I wish someone would take on the challenge of documenting the homes that represented the first wave of affluence in the Camel City, Covering from say 1890-1912. That too would be a fascinating read.


That's a book I would certainly purchase!


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2022 12:26 am 
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My amazing wife gave this to me as a Christmas present. I was waiting to buy it on a trip back to Winston-Salem. I would be interested in a book on large houses built before 1912. I remember a lecture she gave, while still researching/writing the book, and I seem to remember she said she is from the Philadelphia area? Seeing what appeared to be numerous "Main Line" mansions in Winston-Salem, with strong Philadelphia connections, I think is what led to her researching/writing this book? It's a great addition to anyone's library! I can get lost in this book for hours. It's not just about the houses. It's also the people who built and lived in them, which is very interesting stories.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2022 10:44 pm 
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Your wife is special indeed! What a thoughtful gift considering your interest in the Camel City. I bought mine from Bookmarks when it first came out. You’re right F&M when you say that hours of time can be happily consumed poring over all the details in this book. I have really enjoyed all the pictures & info on the houses’ families. It is a must have reference book on all things Winston


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