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 Post subject: UNCSA
PostPosted: Tue Dec 10, 2013 7:07 am 
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Wade Weast, Dean of the School of Music at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA), has announced the establishment of James Allbritten Distinguished Visiting Artist Professorship. The $500,000 endowment provides funding for guest artists in UNCSA’s A. J. Fletcher Opera Institute.

http://www.camelcitydispatch.com/500000 ... llbritten/


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sat Dec 28, 2013 8:31 pm 
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from UNCSA:

"We are saddened to inform you of the passing of School of the Arts founder and longtime supporter Helen Copenhaver “Copey” Hanes (Mrs. James Gordon Hanes, Jr.). She was 96.

Mrs. Hanes supported the School of the Arts in many ways. Her husband, the late James Gordon Hanes, served as a state senator during the 1960s and introduced the legislation that established the North Carolina School of the Arts in 1963. In 1964, Mrs. Hanes and other volunteers helped to organize a phone bank that called almost every phone number in Winston-Salem, raising more than $850,000 to ensure that Winston-Salem would be the future home of the School of the Arts.

Mrs. Hanes served on the UNCSA Board of Trustees as a UNC Board of Governors appointee from 1989-93, and was a founding and longtime member of the UNCSA Board of Visitors and an emerita member at the time of her death. She was a charter lifetime member of the UNCSA Giannini Society, and was a member of the Founders Society, the Encore Society, and the Chancellor’s Circle at the school. She also served on Giannini Society gala and Stevens Center gala opening committees.

Mrs. Hanes received an honorary degree from UNCSA in 2003, and she and her husband (posthumously) received the Giannini Society Award in 2006. She and her husband commissioned a sculpture of dancers for the school that stands in front of Performance Place. In addition, Mrs. Hanes and her husband helped rebuild the school’s sculpture studio after it burned and requested that it be named for the late Martha Dunigan, a School of Design and Production Visual Arts Program faculty emerita.

[ … ]

Gifts to honor the memory of Mrs. Helen Copenhaver Hanes may be made to the University of North Carolina School of the Arts Scholarship Fund: UNCSA Foundation, Inc., 1533 S. Main Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27127. "

Mrs. Hanes in 1957, one of the founding trustees of Old Salem:


http://www.digitalforsyth.org/photos/10594


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 12:57 am 
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The Possum wrote:
from UNCSA:

"We are saddened to inform you of the passing of School of the Arts founder and longtime supporter Helen Copenhaver “Copey” Hanes (Mrs. James Gordon Hanes, Jr.). She was 96.

Mrs. Hanes supported the School of the Arts in many ways. Her husband, the late James Gordon Hanes, served as a state senator during the 1960s and introduced the legislation that established the North Carolina School of the Arts in 1963. In 1964, Mrs. Hanes and other volunteers helped to organize a phone bank that called almost every phone number in Winston-Salem, raising more than $850,000 to ensure that Winston-Salem would be the future home of the School of the Arts.

Mrs. Hanes served on the UNCSA Board of Trustees as a UNC Board of Governors appointee from 1989-93, and was a founding and longtime member of the UNCSA Board of Visitors and an emerita member at the time of her death. She was a charter lifetime member of the UNCSA Giannini Society, and was a member of the Founders Society, the Encore Society, and the Chancellor’s Circle at the school. She also served on Giannini Society gala and Stevens Center gala opening committees.

Mrs. Hanes received an honorary degree from UNCSA in 2003, and she and her husband (posthumously) received the Giannini Society Award in 2006. She and her husband commissioned a sculpture of dancers for the school that stands in front of Performance Place. In addition, Mrs. Hanes and her husband helped rebuild the school’s sculpture studio after it burned and requested that it be named for the late Martha Dunigan, a School of Design and Production Visual Arts Program faculty emerita.

[ … ]

Gifts to honor the memory of Mrs. Helen Copenhaver Hanes may be made to the University of North Carolina School of the Arts Scholarship Fund: UNCSA Foundation, Inc., 1533 S. Main Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27127. "

Mrs. Hanes in 1957, one of the founding trustees of Old Salem:


http://www.digitalforsyth.org/photos/10594


Sad news indeed. This is a major loss not only for UNCSA but for the Winston-Salem Symphony and multiple other cultural and charitable organizations in our city.


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 3:06 am 
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WSJ article:

http://www.journalnow.com/news/local/ar ... 0f31a.html


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 10:51 am 
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Copey was the most kind, generous, and gracious lady. She is in my eye the last of the grand dames of Winston-Salem, only survived by Martha Hanes Womble and Rosemary Harris. She was up there with Dewitt Chatham Hanes in her support and promotion of Winston-Salem and it's institutions.


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Wed Jan 01, 2014 10:50 pm 
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Interior view of the Carolina Theater showing the original proscenium arch ornamentation which was destroyed during renovation as the Stevens Center:

Image


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 9:17 pm 
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FROM YES WEEKLY:Chalk up another accolade for UNC School of the Arts, as the UNC-TV broadcast of the School of Drama’s 2012 production of the Shakespeare classic Much Ado About Nothing received an Emmy Award nomination in the category of arts programming.

“It is thrilling news,” said UNC School of the Arts executive producer Katharine Laidlaw, in an official statement. “This nomination is testament to the remarkable talent of our students and faculty, not to mention the hard work we put in to capture the essence of the live production in film. We are pleased we were able to share this unique production with viewers across the state through our partnership with UNC-TV.”

Added Shannon Vickery, UNC-TV’s director of production: “It highlights the wonderful programming being produced through our partnership, and it showcases the very talented students, faculty and staff of UNCSA.” The UNC School of the Arts, or UNCSA production of Much Ado About Nothing was presented on campus March 29-April 7, 2012 and was broadcast statewide on UNC-TV on April 9, 2013.

The UNCSA Studio IV (senior class) production was directed by long-time faculty member Bob Francesconi (also assistant dean at the School of Drama) and featured scenic designs by John V. Bowhers, then a student at the university’s School of Design & Production. Bowhers was also the recipient of the 2012 W. Owen Parker Award from the US Institute for Theatre Technology, which is the highest award for a student scenic designer in the entire nation. The costumes were designed by Christine Turbitt, also a long-time UNCSA faculty member and director of the university’s costume design and technology program.

This production also marked another first, as it featured the American premiere of Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s complete score — the first fully integrated production since Korngold’s music was outlawed by the Third Reich in 1933. Korngold, who was born in Austria-Hungary (now the Czech Republic) was a promising young composer for opera and orchestral music when he was forced to flee Europe because he was Jewish. Emigrating to the United States, Korngold soon found his way to Hollywood and Warner Bros., where he became one of the studio’s preeminent film composers. He earned an Academy Award for his rousing score of The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and earned subsequent, successive nominations for The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939) and The Sea Hawk (1940).

A new edition of Korngold’s score has been prepared by the music-publishing house Schott in collaboration with noted conductor and former UNCSA chancellor John Mauceri, who conducted the UNCSA chamber orchestra (comprised of high school, college and graduate instrumentalists from UNCSA’s School of Music) for the production. The commercial recording of the score was released in April by Toccata Classics to favorable reviews.

The cast of the UNCSA production included Jackie Robinson as Beatrice, Ari Itkin as Benedick and Jessica Richards as Hero. The filmed version was directed by David Stern, who also helmed the awardwinning televised production of UNCSA’s production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Oklahoma!. The filmed version was funded by a grant from the AJ Fletcher Foundation in tandem with the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts and the William R. Kenan Jr. Fund for the Arts.

The regional Emmy Awards will be presented Jan. 25 from Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Nashville, Tenn. !


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:22 pm 
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WSJ reports revenue from ticket sales at UNC School of the Arts performances nearly doubled from December 2012 to December 2013, according toofficials at the school. During the fall season in 2013 (August through December), the school saw an increase of 43 percent in the volume of tickets issued, and an increase of 85 percent in revenue over the same period in 2012. Revenue to date for the 2013-14 academic year is $87,236, compared to $47,150 for the same period during 2012-13. The number of tickets sold is 12,998 compared to 9,060 in 2012-13. Laidlaw received the numbers from Scott Spencer, who is in charge of the UNCSA box office.

Katharine Laidlaw, the executive producer who assumed oversight of performance marketing in the fall of 2012, initiated a comprehensive campaign to drive audience development. “Performances are a critical platform for telling our story, for showcasing what we do and why it matters,” Laidlaw said. “More people attending translates to a greater awareness of UNCSA and a deeper understanding of our mission. It strengthens our message and carries it farther, helping us to recruit promising students and talented faculty, and to inspire support of our institution.”

Revenue from most UNCSA performances at the Stevens Center and main campus locations, such as operas, plays and dance concerts, pays for marketing and promoting the productions, and for staff at the venues, including box-office staff and ushers. Revenue from extra productions such as the annual “The Nutcracker” and all-school musicals like “Oklahoma!” and “West Side Story” also support student scholarships.

This year, the school projects that $220,000 from “Nutcracker” ticket sales will be distributed to need-based scholarship students. An additional $25,000 from “Nutcracker” will fund maintenance of the Stevens Center. Concession and merchandise sales during “Nutcracker” earned more than $17,000 to benefit programs such as the high school parent support organization and the senior contemporary dancers’ showcase performance in New York.


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 7:47 am 
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Courtesy of the WSJ. Everyone be sure to buy your tickets early. I attended performances for West Side Story & Oklahoma. Both performances were as good as anything I have seen on Broadway. That sentiment has also been expressed by friends who have also experienced both.

Although it’s part of the venerable University of North Carolina system, UNC School of the Arts marches to a different beat, and its 50th anniversary celebration is gearing up to have a little more flair than the average institution of higher learning. Peter Hedges, a screenwriter and playwright who graduated from UNCSA School of Drama in 1984, announced at Monday night’s gala that the flagship event of UNCSA’s golden-anniversary season will be an all-school production of the musical play “Guys and Dolls” next April at the Stevens Center. Kyle Habberstad, a UNCSA student, sang “I’ve Never Been in Love Before,” a song from the show.

“Guys and Dolls” premiered on Broadway in 1950, ran for 1,200 performances and won the Tony award for best musical. It has had several Broadway and London revivals and was adapted for film in 1955. Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra and Vivian Blaine starred in the movie version. Based on several short stories by Damon Runyon, “Guys and Dolls” has music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and a book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows.

“Guys and Dolls” was selected as the winner of the 1951 Pulitzer Prize for drama, but because Burrows was being targeted by the House Un-American Activities Committee, the trustees of Columbia University vetoed the selection. No Pulitzer for drama was awarded that year.

Recent all-school productions at UNCSA include “Brigadoon” (1995), “West Side Story” (2007) and “Oklahoma” (2011). All-school musicals draw talent from most of UNCSA’s departments: music, drama, dance, production and design. A UNC-TV crew shot “Oklahoma” for broadcast that year. The all-school musicals are great teaching tools, moneymakers and community engagers — but they also sap a lot of the school’s energy and resources and take nearly a year to produce. Katharine Laidlaw is UNCSA’s executive producer for the school’s larger public offerings such as the all-school musicals, the annual “Nutcracker” ballet and Monday night’s gala. She has been with the school since 2008.

“When we produce on a broader, bigger scale, it offers a wider range of experience for students,” Laidlaw said. “It allows you to have a stage manager from production and design who has an assistant, and then there’s a team of younger students assisting them.” Since the musicals pull from all the departments, casting can be less conventional. “One of the leads in ‘West Side Story’ was not a drama student; she was a dancer,” Laidlaw said. “It also allows us to bring guest artists to come in and work with students; students in sound design in ‘Oklahoma’ got to work with Scott Lehrer.” Lehrer received the first-ever Tony award for sound for his work on the 2008 revival of “South Pacific” at Lincoln Center Theater.

Notable alumni attended and participated in Monday night’s gala, “A School Is Born.” It was held on soundstages in the school’s film village, the ACE Cinema Complex. Hedges was the master of ceremonies. Actress Rosemary Harris, best known as Tobey McGuire/Spider-Man’s aunt; writer John Ehle, Harris’ husband and a professor at UNCSA; and Trieste Kelly Dunn (Drama 2004), who is currently playing in the “Banshee” series on Cinemax, were among those participating. The next event in the year-long celebration will be a Community Day at UNCSA in September. A new chancellor M. Lindsay Bierman will take the helm in July.


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2014 10:57 am 
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Lynn Felder/Winston-Salem Journal

UNC School of the Arts will continue its 50th anniversary celebration with a Community Festival on Sept. 20 and the first in a three-part literary-arts series on Sept. 21, on its campus. Students first attended classes at the state arts conservatory in September 1965, and the school is celebrating throughout 2014-15 with these and other events, including a production of “Guys and Dolls” in April. Lindsay Bierman, the school’s new chancellor, will welcome attendees to the Community Festival, and the conservatory’s five schools will give presentations and performances, suitable for all ages.


A “kid-zone” area will offer 10-minute portraits by visual-arts students, photo opportunities with characters from Peppercorn Children’s Theatre’s “Peter and the Wolf,” face-painting by students in make-up design, a stilt walker, balloon artist, puppet making and yard games. Jim DeCristo, director of external affairs, is the school’s interim chief advancement officer and co-chair of the 50th anniversary committee. “This is our way of saying thank you to Winston-Salem and all of North Carolina for 50 years of support,” DeCristo said. “I hope it will be a day of discovery for those who have never visited our campus, and rediscovery for those who have.” Parking for the festival is at the Gateway YWCA, 1300 S. Main St. Shuttles will be provided to campus. Local food truck vendors will be selling refreshments.



Can one by chance see The Possum 'hanging around" during the festivities?? :wink:


UNCSA will share its varied literary heritage in a three-part speaker series, starting Sept. 21.


“Working Here/Writing Here: a Celebration of UNCSA Faculty Writers” will feature six faculty members reading from their works. The participants are Laura Hart McKinny, Dale Pollock, Julian Semilian and Nola Schiff from the School of Filmmaking; Matthew Bulluck from the School of Drama; and Ellen Rosenberg from the Division of Liberal Arts.

Bulluck was awarded the Playwright's Fellowship from the N.C. Arts Council for his play “Minnesota Green.” His plays have been developed by the Great Lakes Theatre Festival, the North Carolina Playwrights Center, and in New York by HERE and the Hudson Guild Theatre. A graduate of The Juilliard School, Bulluck joined the UNCSA faculty in 1997.


McKinny began teaching at UNCSA in 1993 as a founding member of the Film School faculty. She has written two novels, several short stories and screenplays, and a filmed stage adaptation of “The Land Breakers” by John Ehle, to name a few.


Pollock started writing about movies in 1973 in Santa Cruz, Calif. He became the entertainment editor of the Santa Cruz Sentinel, and then the chief film critic for Daily Variety in Los Angeles. In 1984 he wrote “Skywalking: The Life and Films of George Lucas,” which has sold more than 150,000 copies and remains in print 30 years after its original publication.


Semilian has published two novels, a book of poems and various books of translations. His most recent novel, “Osiris with a Trombone Across the Seam of Insubstance,” was published by Spuyten Duyvil Press. He joined the UNCSA Film School faculty in 1998.


Rosenberg is associate professor of Humanities in the Division of Liberal Arts, where she has taught creative writing since 2002. An author and actor whose poetry, stories and plays have been featured in performance in Indiana, New York and the Carolinas, she supports local artists and authors through community service and by editing, script doctoring and mentoring writing ventures.


Born in Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia ( now Zambia), Schiff has taught in the School of Filmmaking since 2006. Her first novel, “The Hissing Tree,” was completed in 2013.


Joseph Mills, the Susan Burress Wall Distinguished Professor of Humanities at UNCSA, will host the event and moderate. He Mills has published five volumes of poetry, including the recently-released “This Miraculous Turning.”


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2014 10:32 pm 
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Journal editorial board

It seems a natural fit: A collaborative program that brings together personnel and resources from the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and the UNC School of the Arts. They call the project “The Artist’s Studio,” and its first public presentation will be today. We predict it will be well worth attending. This is part of a nascent trend among local organizations. We’d like to see a lot more of it.

The first Artist’s Studio project will combine Neil Goldberg, a conceptual artist with a show at SECCA through Oct 5, with dancers and faculty in the schools for dance and film at UNCSA, the Journal’s Lynn Felder reported. It will include a ticketed public event at 2 p.m. today at SECCA that will combine live performance and discussion, according to Mark Leach, executive director at SECCA. David Ford of WFDD will moderate. A second collaboration is planned for February. Both organizations have missions that involve arts education. Both offer exhibits and performances to the public. And both have unique aspects and strengths that may well be enhanced by their collaboration. Surely this will be a learning experience for everyone involved – especially the audience.

The idea is the brainchild of Susan Jaffe, dean of dance at UNCSA, who took the idea to David Nelson, the UNCSA provost. From there it went to Mark Leach, the executive director at SECCA. “Guest artists from SECCA and UNCSA will be ‘cross-pollinating’ the different arts schools at UNCSA,” Leach told the Journal. “From dance to music and visual arts to film, contemporary artists will be creating synergies between the disciplines of the studio — the space where the arts are incubated and take shape. We then will invite audiences to experience the artistic process as it unfolds in a culminating event.”

Felder reported that while Jaffe was at the American Ballet Theatre in New York (she’s still a ballet mistress there), she worked on a similar project at the Guggenheim Museum called Works & Process. “They bring in choreographers, and then they’ll do a show-and-tell about the choreography and give people and inside view of the creative process,” Jaffe said. “This was sort of inspired by that, but we came up with our own version with SECCA, so it was inspired by the Works & Process events.” The organizers already have enough faith in the effort to plan further collaborations down the road.

Organizers say they hope the Artist’s Studio will support dialogue and understanding around contemporary art for the public, while creating educational opportunities for students, the Journal reported. With years of belt-tightening from the state, both organizations have seen their share of challenges in recent times. But one thing that’s never been in doubt is the quality of the art they produce. Collaboration presents the possibility of taking things to the next level for both groups.

I totally agree with the Journal's opinion and feel that this is a homerun for the City of Arts & Innovation. Something that definitely sets us apart as a City and is very attractive especially for the creative class.


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:14 pm 
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coool.


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 12:23 pm 
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Lynn Felder/Winston-Salem Journal

The UNC School of the Arts’ production of “The Nutcracker” has surpassed last year’s record-breaking ticket sales.

Six more performances will be presented through Sunday. As of Tuesday, ticket sales totaled $476,661, about $5,000 more than last year’s sales. Ticket sales records were broken in 2009 and then in successive years 2011, 2012 and 2013. School officials expect final ticket sales for “The Nutcracker” to exceed $500,000 for the first time in the production’s history. All proceeds from the performances go to pay for student scholarships at UNCSA.


:tup:


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 10:54 am 
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GUYS & DOLLS is a must-see!

Reviews don't get any better than this . . .

http://www.journalnow.com/relishnow/the ... 9da97.html


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 Post subject: Re: UNCSA
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 7:56 am 
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Lynn Felder/Winston-Salem Journal

Wade Weast, UNC School of the Arts’ dean of the School of Music, will resign on July 6.

In his new position, associate dean for music and the arts in the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia State University, Atlanta, Weast will direct the School of Music and Welch School of Art and Design. Weast became dean in 2010. Under his leadership, the school recently launched the Chrysalis Chamber Music Institute, which will host two annual residencies by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and provide pro-fessional development for graduate student musicians.

Under Weast’s leadership, the music school received more than $4.7 million for scholarships, guest artists and programs. The music school recently received the largest planned gift in UNCSA’s history, a $2.2 million endow-ment. An interim dean will be named, and the school will begin an international search for the next music dean soon, Provost David Nelson said.


Sounds like a big loss for UNCSA. :(

The Possum wrote:
GUYS & DOLLS is a must-see!

Reviews don't get any better than this . . .

http://www.journalnow.com/relishnow/the ... 9da97.html


If it can top the last two all school productions of Oklahoma & West Side Story, then it means that nothing on Broadway can touch it. :tup:


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